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Our SHAPE mail carrier is riding hard to deliver these letters. If you are a descendant or know of a family who may be descendants of anyone mentioned in these letters please contact us.



Camp Chase Prison
Near Columbus Ohio
April 20th 1862

Dear Brother
I will seat myself this morning to inform you and rest of my friends in old Augusta that I am well and hearty as I was when you last saw me, and in hopes when these few lines reaches, you may all be well also. I have just written a letter to my uncle in this state. I write a great many letters, but don’t get any. And therefore I will request you all to write as often as you can for nothing on this earth affords me more pleasure than to hear from home. Billy I want you to take care of all my things for me that Chatty is not able to do and I will satisfy you for your trouble. Take care of Bill and feed him good and also carry him as I used to do if you know how good that is. And above all things take care of little Armstrong and Chatty. Lizzy and her little ones, and also that old fousee on the rack. This Easter is a very dry time to me here. But I hope you will make it up for me. We can’t tell one day from another here only when it rains, it is the same thing over and over. We have preaching here every Sunday by some of our Secesh preachers of the fort donelson prisoners. But among the good, we have a great many bad. I am trying to content myself by making little tricks, like walking canes, pussli boxes, finger rings. Of the latter I am now ingaged in, which we sell to bring us a little money. We are doing as well as could be expected. Plenty to eat, plenty to wear, and nothing to do. And are treated very kindly by all so you may rest easey as to our treatment.
I heard from Charly Smith and the rest of them, and also seen Wm Sidrick who claimed to be your cousin. He told me to send his love to you all in the next letter I sent home. Give my love to all inquiring friends in old Augusta and also receive a good portion for yourself. Chatty & Cally write soon as you can to Armstrong

Authorities will please pass this letter and oblige me by its transportation through the lines. A




Camp Chase Ohio
Aprile the 20th 1862

Dear Wife I sese this opertunity to write to you as it be the first time that that has avaled me the pleasure. I am in this place a prisoner. I was taken at Mills Springs on the 19 of January. I stade at summeased wating on the wounded up till the 9th of last month. I landed hear on the 18th. I have had my helth very well but I have bin studying about you if I could but hear from you I could bare my imprisonment mutch beter but I must content my self by thinking that you are in as good circumstances as if I was thair under the circumstances I could doo no good. I want you to cher up and be in good cher. I think God will permit me to return some time but I have no idiea when that pleasure will be fulfilied. I hop little Orpha is well and can talk to you. God bless you both. May God keep and protect you from all harm it may be a year before you and I meete agane and prehap never a gane but I am imprest that you will rite to me at this place Columbus Ohio Prison No 8 Camp Chase Reb Prison No 8. My parin is that you may be protected from all harme. Give my best respects to all inquiring frind far well God bless you
Napoleon P. Blair

Envelope is addressed to:

Mrs Nancy A Blair
Limestone Springs
Greene County
East Tennessee

N. P. Blair (First_Last)
Regiment Name 29 Tennessee Infantry.
Side Confederate
Company H
Soldier's Rank_In Private
Soldier's Rank_Out Corporal
Alternate Name
Notes
Film Number M231 roll 4




Fort Warren Boston Harbor
Mass Mary 31st 1862

Mr Valentine Wiss
My Dear Sir Sometime ago I asked Col Gautt where his men were sent he could not tell me definitely but presumed to Chicago. I wrote to you any way and directed it to Chicago. Having never received a reply I concluded that the letter never reached you or that you were in some other portion of this kingdom and would never have learned better until getting out of here, but for a letter from Capt. Whilson to you which was miss backed to Maj M Collins. He speaks of sending it to you. I have made inquiry for you and others from various ones but could never hear a word from Wiss. Why it is that you and Dr Green and others could not write to me I am unable to say. Can you tell why if so now is the accepted time. If you don’t write me a letter I will take all the sewing from you. I can and do other little under handed tricks and of course my influence will seriously damage the Buglers flattering prospects. In view of these threats I think you will readily see it will be greatly to your interest to write. Tell Jerry if he don’t write I will do what I can when I go home “which will be very son”(I hope)” to infure his very flattering prospects on Haleys Creek.
I received on the 19th inst a few lines from J. L. Williams written on the 12th. He simply stated all were well. From accounts you all hear from Old Hickman oftener than we do. Any news from that quarter which yu may write will be always thankfully received. 32 Privateersman left here this evening for the land of Dixie. They are to be joined by the Savanah crew at Fortress Monroe and all are to be exchanged I understand. I hope it is so. I think if this exchange can be effected I hope then for a general exchange. Be sure to write me on receipt of this. All are well here.

Your Friend
John F. Gray

Camp Chase Prison 3 Mess 80
April 21st 1862


Volentine Wiss (First_Last)
Regiment Name 9 Battalion (Gantt's) Tennessee Cavalry.
Side Confederate
Company D
Soldier's Rank_In Musician
Soldier's Rank_Out Private
Alternate Name
Notes
Film Number M231 roll 47




Camp Chase Prison
Near Columbus O April 26th / 62

Hon O. R. Singleton
H. R. Richmond Va

Dear Sir, Mrs Clark a lady of this state having obtained permission to visit Richmond, kindly offers to become the bearer of letters from “Rebels” to their friends in “Dixie”. I have been here principally ever since the surrender of Fort Donaldson. I will thank you & my friends to do all that can de done to effect an exchange for me at the earliest moment possible. Gov Brown Maj Brinksdale & Gov McRae formerly knew me very well. I am a young member of the Carrolton Bat & 2nd Leiut Co “C” 20th Miss Reg. Capt ______
Please write me by return of Mrs Clark and inform me whether Maj Brown of my Reg was aided in being exchanged. Very Respectfully & c
Frank W Keyes

Crosswise across top of letter is written:
Please enclose this within letter to Dr G 11th Miss Rt. It was in Whitings Brigade when I last heard from it. Lt Col P F Liddell Comdg.


Envelope:
From Leiut Keyes
20th Miss Regt
Prisoner of War

Hon O. R. Singleton
House of Representatives
Richmond Virginia

Camp Chase Prison April 25th 1862

Dr Geo R Griffith
Co K 11th Miss Regt

Dear George – I have an opportunity by which it is probable a letter will get through. I am in constant correspondence with Claudine. Recd a letter from her 4 or 5 days since. Ma’s health is tolerable good. All others are well. Nellie & Benty were married 23rd Sept last. 70 members of my company were surrendered at Donelson including all the officers. George is in good health so are Jeff & Monroe Liddell. My health has been remarkably good. I have applied for permission to visit Ma’s family but Gov Tod has not notice my application as yet. I would be under lasting obligation to him if he would. I have another motive in view for visiting Yankees. If my wishes are gratified I will get a wife there when this terrible war ends. Give my respects to all.

Very truly your friend & c
F. W. Keyes

Write by fortress Monroe & no war news.

P.S. all letters containing contraband news are refused us.


Francis W. Keyes (First_Last)
Regiment Name 20 Mississippi Infantry
Side Confederate
Company C
Soldier's Rank_In 1 Sergeant
Soldier's Rank_Out 1 Lieutenant




Economy Ind.
May 15th 1862.

Friend A. Jackson Wood –
Having heard that you are a prisoner in Columbus Ohio, I write this note to learn with certainty whether it is so. Having once borne the relation to each other of teacher and scholar, however much our opinions may have differed then, or may differ now on political subjects, it is natural for there to be somewhat of sympathy existing between us, and something of an anxiety on my part to know whether one of my former scholars is really held as a prisoner of war by the U. S. Government, as is reported. If this reaches you please drop me a line informing me of your whereabouts & c. What office did you hold when in the army? I expect to visit Columbus sometime in June or July & if you still remain at that place, & it were possible I should be very much pleased to see you.

Very respectfully your old friend

Thomas Charles.

P. S. Direct to Economy Ind.




Camp Chase 20 April ‘62

My Dear Wife

I take this opportunity of writing to you. I am well at present and doing very well. After we left Somerset we were carried to Louisville Ky and stayed there four or five weeks and then came to this place wich is near Columbus Ohio where I am well treated and comfortably situated. Tell Father and Mother where I am tell them not to be uneasy about me for I am well and perfectly safe. I don’t know when I will be at home but as soon as I can. You must keep a good heart and not be troubled any more than possible about me. Kiss our dear little ones for me do the best you can for them. You need not answer this for I don’t think it will reach me. Good bye dear wife Yours ever A.J. Lowe


Andrew J Lowe
29 Reg Tenn Vol

To:
Mrs. Martha Lowe
Midway Depot
E TN & VA RR

In TN



Camp Chase Columbus Ohio
April 21st 1862

Dear Sister
This is to inform you of my whereabouts. Was taken prison on Teusday. Will be two weeks here been here one. Am pleased to say this leaves me well am healed very well although rather wounded. I am in hopes this will meet you all my dear sister in good health – also my Boy. Hope he is a good one. Kiss him for me. Am only allowed to write but one page and it has to be overlooked by the commander so my letter must be short. Do not fret but hope that we will meet soon. It might have been worse. See how many poor fellows have fallen at Pittsburg. God grant that we will be soon together again. Respects to all friends. Tell Frankland to tell Brooks to send [censored] with funds. God bless you. A S Levy

A.S. Levy (First_Last)
Regiment Name 42 Tennessee Infantry.
Side Confederate
Company I
Soldier's Rank_In 2 Lieutenant
Soldier's Rank_Out 2 Lieutenant



April 21st 1862

Camp Chase near Columbus Ohio
Dear Brother I write you a few lines to let you and friends know where I am. I am here a prisoner of war. After holding our position at new Madrid & Island no 10 for 7 weeks against a vastly superior force on the 9th just we were surrendered by our officers as prisoners of war. I could have made my escape but would not desert my men but after we were taken I was separated from my men. They were sent to Springfield & Chicago Ill and myself & C. Snider who is my 2nd Lieut was sent to this place. I am as well situated as I could expect under the circumstances. We are furnished with common rations of soldiers upon which we can make out but I am without clothing or money. I lost everything that I had but what I had on. We had drawn no money. If I had 20 or 25 dollars I could get along very well.
If I can do no better I will have to sell my watch for what ever I can get but I will not sell it as long as I can help it. I have heard nothing from any one since we parted. My self and Snider is well. I wrote to my wife a few days ago via Nashville. If you receive this _________________
Columbus Ohio prison no. 3
Your affectionate Brother until death
A. G. Har???????

Aron G. Hammack (First_Last)
Regiment Name 40 Tennessee Infantry. (5 Confederate Inf. Walker's Reg't Vols.)
Side Confederate
Company K
Soldier's Rank_In Captain
Soldier's Rank_Out Captain
Alternate Name Aaron G./Hammock



Columbia

April 9th 1862

Dear Brother I take the opportunity to wright you a few lines we ar all well at the pressant time and hope when thes lines come to hand that you ar enjoying the same blessing. Clay I send you ten dollars. By
Clay you must wright to me as soon as you can.
Your Brother
B H Brideforth




Camp Chase near Columbus Ohio.
April 20th 1862.

Sergt. W H Storey

My Dear Sir!

I Address thse few lines to you merely to inform you that we arrived safe at Camp Chase near Columbus Ohio, Major Higgins is still with us. I would have writing to you sooner, but did not know for certain whre the Company was send to. Please write to me and let me know how the boys are getting along, send me a full list of all the company that are at Camp Douglas, and if there are any sick let me know, give my love to all of the boys, and tell them to write to me, and let me know how they are getting along. I have been very low spirited ever since I came here, close confinement dos not agree with me, our treatment otherwise has been verry good. Corpl. Look sends his love to all. I would like very mutch to see you all, writhe soon and often to Your Friend

Chas W. Raisler.

P.S. Direct your letter to
Capt. Chas. W. Raisler Prisoner of War.
Camp Chase near Columbus
Prison No. 3. Ohio



Utica May 26 1862

Dear Brother
If I can still call you by that name we have heard that you wer taken prisnor of war at the battle of Fort Donelson. Father went up to Chicago but he could not find you their. He is first Major or principle musician of Col Cushman’s Brg the 53 Ill Cav. When he got down to Pitsbourgh Landing where he is as yet he heard you had been taken to Clombus Ohio. I so please write and let us know where you are and why you don’t come home. Mother is very anxious to see or hear from you.

Yours Truly
E. A. Beers

Is This letter connected to the other Beers letter? GP



Camp Chase near Columbus Ohio

My dear friend Allison

It is with unbounded delight that I take this long wished for opportunity to write to you. I am well at present and getting along first rate under the circumstances. As I have nothing else of any interest to write I will give you a short sketch of my life in prison. We was captured Dec 5th ’61 and taken to Calhoun where we stayed three weeks while there, my mother and several of our townsmen came to see me. They all treated me kindly and expressed great sympathy for my situation. Billie Finch especially. We were kept at Calhoun longer than necessary expecting every day to be exchanged but no offer being made by the Southerners we were sent to Louisville and there locked in the military prison where we had comfortable quarters and were very kindly treated. Friends and relatives were allowed to visit us twice a week and they came in crowds bringing us clothing tobacco and everything that we needed. I made the acquaintance of several very fine young ladies while at L_. Your cousin Sam W. Kincheloe of Hopkins county was a political prisoner at L_ for five or six months but was released a few days ago. We left L_ March 21st and arrived here the next morning where we are safely housed in an inclosure of about six acres with four rows of comfortable cabins extending from one end of prison to the other. We have ample rations and cook for ourselves each cabin being supplied with a good cooking stove and all necessary cooking utensils. So we are as well situated as prisoners could expect. My compliments to Charley R Capt Billie Lieuts Wickliff and Harris and all the other boys. We have been waiting anxiously through all the long months of our imprisonment for an exchange but alas! We have looked in vain. Our despondant hearts have many times been cheered by the news of a speedy exchange but as many times sorely disappointed. Jim Watthall is well. The remainder of my comrades from Wickliffe’s King’s Bush’s and Bigg’s companies are well and send their kindest regards to their respective co’s. My kindest regards to Orderly H Peyton and Foreman. May you come out of this awful struggle unscathed is the prayer of every friend . J B Hall



NEW LETTERS

Camp Chase Collumbus Ohio April 26th / 62

Mrs S S Griffin Dear Sister
I will drop you a few lines as I suppose you are getting uneasy about me. Was are all here in prison at Collumbus Ohio. We get plenty to eat and have a good house to stay in. My health is very good at this time. I will only write you a short letter as we are limited but I hope that I will get home before long. I can send this letter to Richmond VA by a lady who will forward it to you. Tell mother not to be uneasy for I live better here than we did in camp. My health has improved since coming to this place. Give my respects to all of the relation. I hope I will see you all soon.
J M Hall
P S direct your letter to Camp Chase Prison No 9 Collumbus Ohio to me a prisoner of war by the way of Richmond write to me. J M H



Prison No 3 Camp Chase O.
Near Columbus Ohio
April 21 1862

Dear Parents.
I have been desirous of writing to you for some time & now avail myself of the first opportunity offered since I was taken prisoner at Fort Donelson. I heard from you through Jno Walker & Moses Craddoce, who were taken at Island No. 10.
My health is remarkably good, and I am very pleasantly situated taking into consideration that I am a prisoner. I trust this will find you both well.

Your affectionate son
James Griffin



Camp Chase Prisin No 3
Near Columbus Ohio

Mrs J. M. Sanders } April 20th 1862

My Dear Wife and Children I this morning seat myself to write you a few lines to let you know that I am a prisner of war. We was serenndered on the 8th Inst at Island 10 and brought to this place on 15th. My helth is as good as common and I do hope that these lines may find you all in good helth. Expect you are in a good deal of trouble about me. I want you to give your selves as little trouble about me as you can for we are treated as kindly as prisners cold desire. We have good shantys furnished with good cook stoves and plenty of wood and plenty of good holsom diet to cook & eat. The only thing that is bad is liberty. We cant go home or any where else further than our prisin bounds extends. I want you to do the best that you can until I come home and I can not tell when that will be. Write to me send your letter Camp Chase prisin No 3 near Columbus Ohio via Norfolk VA. I will now close hoping that the almighty will shield and pertect us through coming days. Yours ever true until deth. James M Sanders

N B E H Stewart is with me. Let his wife know that he is well. J C Hall was left in
_________ _________ and we have not herd from him since the privates was sent to Chicago Illinois all the officers of the 11th Ark Regt is hear and a great many from Tenn Miss Ala & c. I do not know the numbers. Give our kindest regards to all of our friends.
J. M. Sanders

Addressed to:

Mrs Sanders
Rockport Ark.



Gallatin Co, Ky May 30, 1862

My Dearest Father

I have just returned from Owenton and left Ma and all the family as well as you could expect under all the circumstances. Ma suffers more in mind about you, than if you were really dead she says then, she would know that you would be beyond suffering and now she don’t know how much you may have to suffer and she cant do anything for you but pray and if prayers can avail anything you will certainly be home soon for there is not one hour in the day or night without supplications going up to the throne of mercy in your behalf and not for you alone but for all those in like circumstances. This is a time to try mens souls we have found may friends good and kind in places where we least expected them there is not a man in Owenton but will do all in their power to have you all released some of the Union men say they will go to Washington if they cannot accomplish it without. You must try to be cheerful and hopeful. Don’t give up, for it will operate against your health the women dread you getting sick there more than anything else tell your fellow prisoners their families were all well yesterday and still hoping for the best.
Trust in God, be faithful and true and he will never for sake you. Drive all wicked thoughts from your heart and only remember the Lord has said vengeance is mine and I will repay. Tis a joyful though to those that are prepared for it to know there is a day coming when all shall be judged according to the deeds done in the boddy, those that have done good shall inherit eternal life and joy and peace and those that have done evil shall meet everlasting punishment.
Willy will stay with Ma until you come back, which I hope will not be long. Ma will write to you soon, but she feels as if she could not do so for a few days, and that is why I have written first, feeling that it is my privilege as I am your eldest your first born your loving Jane.



Camp Chase Columbus Ohio
April 20th 1862

Dearest Mother
God has willed it, that I should be prisoner of war separated by an insurmountable barrier from my all, my near relatives and dear friends. However as it is his decree I will bear it cheerfully. How often do I now in my lonely prison hours think of your fond affection, kind & gentle care. Since my confinement I have been somewhat unwell but now thanks be to God I am again tolerably well. Tell Pa to use all his influence to have me again restored to you. My love to him and all the family. Embrace them one and all for me. Write to me often as that will be one of my greatest consolations now. You can easily do so or a flag of truce “Fortress Monroe”. I hear this by a noble southern lady who has done all in her power to relieve our sufferings as much as possible. Try and see her. With sincere devotion I remain your affectionate son. John J Guthrie Jr

Direct
John Guthrie Jr
Prison No 3 Camp Chase
Columbus Ohio


Mrs John J Guthrie
Care of J O Greenlaw Esq

Memphis Tennesse

J..J. Guthrie (First_Last)
Regiment Name 26 Tennessee Infantry. (3 East Tenn. Vols.)
Side Confederate
Company -
Soldier's Rank_In -
Soldier's Rank_Out -



Camp Chase Prison Coum
Ohio Apr the 20th 1862

Dear Wife
I received yours of Feby the 24th the 11th March, also yours the 9th of April yesterday. They were gladly received. I hope by this time, that you have declined visiting me, while here, as visits in time of war are attended with verry little comfort. Console your self in the thought of my return as best you can; in the attempt to make a crop, I beg you, to look to the preservation of your health. Use money as you need and think best. I would learn who is living with you. Tell Saluda to be a good girl. Tell Ma to keep in good spirits and not labor too hard. We are in the hands of a merciful God, in him I trust to meet my friends again on earth, before verry long. I have written you & my friends several letters. I wrote your Father another letter, or rather you, a few days ago. James has received two letters from Emily. Uncle James is with us and stands up much better than we supposed. We are all yet alive, and tolerable well. We room together, we get enough to eat, and have some 3 acres to walk over. We have drawn some clothing, we buy tobacco with canes & finger rings. You need not grieve because my money is scarce, I can get along. I have heard from home by Mr A. Garten & others, news, good & bad. Health in camp is tolerable good, we are in fine spirits. Let us all pray to him who rules in Heaven above and earth beneath, that a speedy, lasting and honorable peace of our destracted country be once more restored. Write when you can.
Yours while Life lasts John Lilly
To Mrs Ida Lilly Prisoner of War



St Catharines June 30 / 62

Mr Rob’t Beers,
My dear Friend; I write a few lines and will wait to see whether you get this before I write much to you.
I have had some instructions that you were at Camp Chase and so I direct this there.
Myself & family are here in West Cannada. I wish we could see you for your Mother’s sake as well as your own. She was well as usual. So was your father and other friends. They knew that you were wounded and that you were in the hospital when it fell into the hands of the Union troops. So they judge you are a prisoner. Still they were very anxious as your wound might have proved fatal. Your dear Mother, however, bears all with Christian fortitude.
I have heard from Eddie Treat and have notified Mr St Jolie who is in N. Y. of his whereabouts & he has sent Eddie some clothing.
We were at Mr Meikle’s house and staid all night. I told them all I know of you at that time, and Mr Meikle immediately set about searching by correspondence for you. As soon as I learned that you were at Camp Chase I sent him word. You must let him and me both know how you are and what you need to make you comfortable; also how Mr Plure is and what he needs. His mother is a member of my church. We wish to do what we can for you both as well as for all militias. Give me all particulars that you can.
I have written to a minister of my acquaintance in Columbus and requested him as a special favor to give you some attention. Tell Mr Plure that his mother had been quite sick but was doing comfortably well for her, that his sister was also well. They were both very anxious about him as they had heard he was dangerously wounded.
I had a hemorrhage and was compelld to stop preaching for a time so I started for Europ via Havannah. Our vessel was captured and we were brought to N. Y. where we were at liberty to go voluttur & we visited. We came here. I may yet go to Europe. We hope to return to Auoricle in a few months to heal. I may resume my labors. There were 58 additions to our church last year. Be of good courage. God bless you my Christian brother and your companions in misfortune. Mrs B sends love. Your affectionate friend & pastor J W Burgett.

On envelope:

Mr Robert Beers (Prisoner of War)
Camp Chase
Columbus Ohio




Newer Letters

Bridgeport June the 13th 1862

Mr Middleton, I take the liberty of writing you a few lines. Your father come to see me knowing that I had received a goo many letters from different places from my Rebel kin and friends. He could not find out where you was at. I wrote to Camp Butter near Springfield Ill to J. E. Dromgoole a frind of mine and he wrote back and let me know that you was at Camp Chase. I seen your pa on last Monday. I told him where you was at. He said he would write and told me to write to you. Your family and friends are all well. The health of your old neighborhood is very good everybody in our County is quiet yet but I can’t tell how long it will be so. The Federal officers are arresting men in Shelby _______ Anderson Henry & Owen every day or two. Some they send off others they turn loose. I think you have and old friend of mine with you from Tenn; Capt Butter who was taken at Donelson. Give him my best respects tell him I received his very kind letter about the death of H H Harrison. Write to me. I remain yours & c.
J R Middleton Sam O Crockett



April 21, 1862

Dear father I seet my self to inform you all that I am well and I hope those few loines will find you all well. I receve your letter dated March the 26. I was glad to here from you all gave my love to mother & Brother & Sisters. You wanted to no when I could come home. I do not no when but I don’t think it will be very long. I must bring my letter to a close by saying write soon as you get my letter and remember your Son until death.

Samuel M Moses To Charles Moses

Charles Moses

To

Sam Moses

Back Creek Sherands August
Count, VA

May the 26
My Dear Brother
As I have some chance to send a letter I thought I would write you a few lines one of our Nothren friends a clever gentleman too. Tom I am well and doing well under the present circumstances. I would like so much to here from you we are all well. Tom I want you to answer this as soon as you can write. How all the boys are getting on. Tom tell me where Georgees is George Barrigh is dead. Sam Clay and Tom Davison is gone to. Davis has been home recruiting he look as well as Iever saw him. Tom you must answer this as soon as you get it. You must be_______. I haven’t the chance to write much. I recon I will have to come to a by asking you to write soon. Tom I had despaired of hering from you ever again but this gentleman Cor Stanly try to convey this letter to you by some meanes if all thi\e Northern men are like him I think you are doing very well. Tom I will come to a close write soon I am under many lasting obligations to this gentleman for his kindness towards me believe me to be your sincere and affectionate
Good Bye Sister Sue

P S Brother Warrens family is well and James sends his love to you
Give my love to all the boys.




April 14 / 62

Camp Chase near Columbus Ohio

Dear Father Brothers and Sister there is a lady going to start to Richmond Virginia and she sis that she will take our letters through for us and we thought that we might let you hear from us but we are not a loud to write very mutch as it has to be examind and if we was to write verry mutch it would take up to mutch time. I cant write mutch but a few lines to let you know that I am well and all of the mess are well at the present we are all writing home. Today it is not worth while to say enny thing about them. Capt Hamnolk was taken at the surrender of Island No. 10. Our boys is at Chicago. There has been six of them died since the surrender of Fort Donelson. Gumbold Harisson Hogue Leemon and two of the McLinder. I heard that Norwood and B. F. Gibson had reached home. Give my love to all the children and inquireing friends. I have wrote more than I am a loud to but hope that they will let it go through. I remain your son until death.
T. T. Foster

T.T. Foster (First_Last)
Regiment Name 42 Tennessee Infantry.
Side Confederate
Company 1 F
Soldier's Rank_In 2 Lieutenant
Soldier's Rank_Out 3 Lieutenant



April 14, 1862


My Dear Nephew
I fear you have thought your friends forgetful of you in your captivity. Far from it we have done every thing in our power to shorten or to soften it. I hope your acquaintances Miss Jackson & Miss Baker learned of your whereabouts. I wrote to the former but whether she ever received my letter I have not learned. We have at three separate times been told you were exchanged. I still hope you were among the last exchanges as the name Hooper was on the list. Since we heard that our mails have been stopped & we have only the occasional information brought by letter from Southern friends. Mr Hardin together with several other gentlemen went down towards Corinth to see about their boys after the late battle but Beauregard would not allow them to pass his lines. So after learning that their sons were all well & unhurt they are returning. Mr H will probably be at home tomorrow. God be praised for guarding over loved ones. I verily believe he directs every ball & to his tender care I commit my darling noble boy, but I cannot trust myself on this subject & indeed must not write more than just to say that if you can let us know where you are we can now perhaps send you your clothes & some money. All our Carolina & Florida friends were in their usual health when we heard last. Your Father was there in Fayetteville. Perhaps while I am writing you may be with him. I can’t say much that would interest you but you know our letters must be inspected. Gen Negley who is in charge here does every thing to render our position as little irksome as circumstances will permit. We could not have fallen into the hands of a more courteous & humane enemy & I hope some of us may live to see the time when we may return his kind consideration, or rather show our sense of it by something more than empty words. With love from Sue & Cynthia I am your affectionate Aunt C.C.H.

Your kind friend Miss M is as kind as ever. Inquired most affectionately after you. Your mother was in Lake City when I heard.



April 22nd 1862

Camp Chase Prison No 3.
Near Columbus Ohio

Dear Father
I take this opportunity of writing you a few lines to let you know how and where I am and the condition as I have an opportunity of sending you this by Mrs Clarke who intends visiting Richmond in a few days. I am a prisoner of war as you will see by this but I am enjoying fine health and I think I will fatten on being a prisoner. I want you to see Mrs Clarke and send me a check on some bank in Columbus Ohio. Give my love to all enquiring friends and tell them to write to me and let me know what they are about. Tell Mother that I am very well and although a prisoner I am as usual perfectly at home as nothing sets me back a bit. Tell Jeff I am very anxious for an exchange and I want him to get me out as soon as possible. Write to me by Mrs Clarke as this will be the only chance for you to do so.
Your Devoted Son
W. D. Seay


On envelope:

From W D Seay a prisoner of war at Camp Chase near Columbus Ohio

Addressed to:

Wm P Seay Esqr
Richmond Virginia



Camp Chase ner Columbus Ohio April 4th 1862

To Mary Lanier
Dear Mother
I seat myself this morning to drop you a few lines to let you her from me once mor if this should ever come to hand. I have the opertunity of sending this letter to Richmond to have it mailed there. There is a lady going to Richmond this week from this state. I received one letter from you and was glad to hear from you. I ancered it but know for sure that you have not got it. I write this hiping it will come to you. If this should reach you I hope you will ancer it. When you write to me enclose 3 cents to pay for mailing fortess Monroe. The 3 cents stamp that they have in the southern states won’t pay the postage in the northern states. This leaves me well and hope if it ever comes to hand it will find you all well. Tell John to write to me and write to all the boys to write to me. I want you all to pray for me. Pray that the time will sone come when we shall be delivered from her. Tell Sarah to be a good girl and tell her to pray to the good lord to take care of her and that we may be permitted to meet again on this earth. But if it is his will that we should not meet again on earth we will so live that we will be permitted to meet in heaven when suffering is known no moor. Your son until death.
Far wel William Lanier



Camp chase near Columbus Ohio April 20th / 62

My Dear Mother
An oppitunity having offorded its self by which I can get a letter through the lines I willingly embrace it to drop you a few lines. As doubliss you are aware I am a prisoner of war Camp Chase. We arrived here from Ft Donnelson on the 1st March. On arriving we were put in a prison of about 3 acres surrounded by a fence fifteen feet high. Within the enclosure are comfortable houses large enough to intertain twelve or fifteen pursons which constitute a mess. The houses are comfortably built & streets regularly laid of & named by us such as Dixie Buckner & c. Our rations are issued to us of the same quantity & quality as they give their own soldiers, perhaps a little better. With the rations & what delicacies we buy we live in fine stile. My mess are all Virginians mostly from the lower portion of the state. Most of them having friends in the North get moneye enough to do us very well. I wrote to Uncle Alfred Brown but have not heard from him why I cannot say. Perhaps I was mistaken in his office. If you can get a letter through the lines let me know his office. The authorities here are very kind indeed & try to make us comfortable. I am limited as to how much I write. I am in fine health now but was quite unwell for some time after I was taken. With love to all. I am as ever your aff son. Wm. A. Coleman

On envelope:

Care of Wm E Coleman

Mrs J C Coleman
Amherst Co Virginia



Camp Chase Ohio

April 3rd 1862

Col Trigg Sir Having learned the object of your visett to this prison and learned the terms on which you think we prisoners of war can be released as Tennessee is my native home I am willing to return to my loyalty in the State of Tennessee and farther I am not willing to do. This is the terms in which I am willing to abide by.
Yours Respectfully
Wm U Brickeen


William M. Brickeen (First_Last)
Regiment Name 3 (Clack's) Tennessee Infantry.
Side Confederate
Company B
Soldier's Rank_In 2 Lieutenant
Soldier's Rank_Out 2 Lieutenant




Pleasant Ville May 21 / 62

Dear husband it is with pleasure that I take this opportunity to inform you that we ar all well at this time hoping these few lines may find you injoying good health. I must inform you that this makes the fourth letter that I have roat to you and I main hops you will receive this one as you roat to me that you had not received either of the first two I roat to you. I had maid my calculations to se you but I was informed by L. Lamb that you had bin tacon to Camp Chase Ohio and I declind the idy of coming to se you. Right to me as soon as you receive this letter as I am at a loss to no when to wright to you and what to wright. I have seen George and we intend to secure all the evidence that we can in your favour. I think that E Watkins will be a material evidence in your favour. You said something in refferance to your babys. They are all well and as fat as pet pigs. Father is still on the mend sloly and I am in hops he will recover his helth again. His family is all well so nothing more at present but remains your loving wife until death. Lucinda to.
M. D. Riblett

N. B. direct your letters to Millfall P O Marion Co



Mr R. Morris, I received yours of the 17 was glad to hear from you. I conveyed it to your wife they are all well you wanted to know about a petition. All I know is that G. W. and Rolly D. got up a petition and they say they sent it on and that is all I know about it and if I can see any chance to do anything for you I will do it but I see no chance. You family is a gitting along tolerable well with their corn health is good now in this settlement. It is peaceable here now on the Crick. It has been very seasonable here. Corn looks well.
The wheat crop is looking well and harvest is now making its appearance. I think that we will soon be engaged in saving the crops.
So no more at present but remains yours
Thomas Thorn



Camp Chase near Columbus, Ohio. April 21 / 62.

Dear Grandpa, as perhaps you have never heard what has become of me, I have thought it proper to inform you in an opportunity just now presents itself for the first time since I was taken prisoner. I was taken prisoner in the battle of Milk Springs from which place I was brought by way of Louisville, to the place, four or five weeks ago. The climate and especially the water of this country did not at first agree with me very well, and I suffered somewhat from the Diahrea, but I am now in fine health. I write to you because I think you will be more apt to get the letter than Mother would be. You will please after you read this letter send it over to Mother and tell her to be of good cheer and suffer no uneasiness on my account, as I can assure you that I am doing as well as could be expected of a prisoner. I know the means for conveying news between the two governments are very slim, but if you have an opportunity, you must let me hear from you all. Write me word where Washington is, and whether he has been at home since the battle. I must bring this to a close as I have not the privilege of writing more than one page. Give my love to Mother and family, and receive my best wishes for yourself. Your affectionate Grandson E. Bible.

Ezekiel Bible (First_Last)
Regiment Name 29 Tennessee Infantry.
Side Confederate
Company I
Soldier's Rank_In Private
Soldier's Rank_Out Private
Alternate Name



Camp Chase Ohio, April 21st 1862

Dear Brother I am in very good helth 15 of ous in a mess all tolerabel well with the exception of Capt John Stuart of Morgan Co. I have had mups I was vaxenated it had vary good effect we have sinc the first of this mont 4 cases of small pox but one cosose in this prisen at this time non have died as yet with the above desese sevrel death sinc the first of March Doc John Huston the only on of my acquantenc which have rote back severel times. I git leters from the other boys at Camp Dugless they have all bin sic 2 have died. A. J. Braden died 12th of March Green Harper died 5th of this inst the boys say they ar vary well treated but anxious to git home they all have rote home. Myself & wess right one or two leters every weak we no not whether aney of them gits home we her from our field officers often they ar at fort waren our Maj McAlexander is probably exchnge we hir of the fite at Corinth & Pittsburg Jackson Moss with them 3000 men was captured ner iland No. 10. They officers brout to this prisen som priseners captured ner Corinth was broat her in in persen. I have not got thor names but think I will in a day or tow. Robert Clark & Wren both ar doing prety well all of ous garding aganst small pox. Thar has bin 2 Geters com her from Ala one from morgan County one from Maderson Co. I have made severel recquesitions for clothing. I am giting pirty sor it is favorable for me to git clothing in a day or to. To close, prisen No 8, mess 58, Peter Barker

27th Alabama
http://www.datasync.com/~jtaylor/compa.htm
Company A --- Franklin County, Alabama
BARKER, Peter, 1st Lt.



Camp Chase Ohio. April 21st 1862 Mess 58 Prison 3.

Dear Sarah
I understand that there is a lady Mrs C. M. Clark who will probably have an opportunity to send a letter through. I make it a part of my business to get letters to you as business is not berry pressing here. I am quite lame yet from an attack of Rheumatism. The Federal Surgeon examined me yesterday for what purpose I do not know. However I believe it is to parole me on account of my health. If so I will have to support myself. I think if I could get out of this prison and a bed to sleep on in place of a hard plank I will improve fast. Our prison is verry damp and the house we are in leaks verry bad. It rains all night and the floor is wet all over there is nothing but a plank rood on it. There is no news here that I can write. I am satisfied that I will improve as soon as Spring opens here. The climate is verry changeable here a great deal more so than in North Ala. I received your letter mailed at Nashville Tenn. On 12th which gave me great satisfaction. The day before I received it Capt Bible & Brindlee came in from Island No 10 and told me you had received a letter from me. Bible is from Limestone Cty and all his company are at Chicago & the officers here. Father wrote to know about Ratliff. I left him at St Louis in hospital. I cannot hear from the company. I wrote several letters but get no answer yet. I have a list of all that are dead that I know of. Viz: John Derrick Jno. O. Rutledge J. A. Sample Uriah Canles of my company.
Hoping this will go direct to you I will transcend the limit of one page hoping they will pass it. You must take good care of your self & send the children to school.
You intimated in yours of the 5th that you thought I would be home soon. I see no prospect of getting home at present for some considerable time unless some of my friends will take an active part to have an exchange. If they could send a federal Captain on parole to exchange for me it could probably be effected through the war department but I am not informed on the subject of exchange & the mode to give much information. I am satisfied if a captain was offered to the war department it would succeed.
We are verry well cared for here in the way of provisions but in our mess wer are likely to suffer in the way of clothes. Some men in the prison have drawn plenty of clothes but we have not as yet. Some of the mess will be able to buy but part of them are not. We have bin unlucky to some extent but live in hope. My mess is all verry cleaver to me in my sickness. As kind as brothers and the ties made here cannot be loosed until death.
I would give the name of my mess but have intruded now on the patience of the reader of letters & c. Tell all my friends to write me as this life is verry monotonous. My respects to all inquiring friends. Kiss the children for me & accept one your self.
Good by
John B. Stuart


Camp Chase near Columbus Ohio April 21 / 62
Prison 3 Mess 58

Thos. J. Foster M. C.
Richmond Virginia

Dear Sir
I take this opportunity believing it will reach you through the hands of Mrs C. M. Clark who I understand intends visiting Richmond Vir. I visited Fort Donalson and the Capt in Company H being absent and at the solicitation of the Lieuts. of the Company and also the privates I was appointed Capt. of the Company in the 27th Ala. Regt. Now in behalf of myself and the Regt generally we call on you & to our Congress to try and effect exchanges for us. Col Hughes & Lieut Col Jackson are at Fort Warren. The Capts and Lieutenants are in this prison in our mess. I give you our names and rank. Viz E. B. Thompson H. B. Irwin & myself are all that is here of the Captains. 1st Lieuts. Peter Barker & Robt Andrews Thos. M McGeehee. 2nd Lieuts. S. C. Brown W. M. Smith W. C. Criner. 3rd Lieuts. I. B. Com & J. J. Olive & Dr Dement Surgeon of the Regiment. W. P. Wren and Robert Clark are also in our mess from Hubbards Cavalry. The privates of our Regt. are at Chicago. There was 279 of our Regt surrendered at Fort Donalson.
Sir we all believing you will use your influence in our behalf submit to you our claims to be exchanged as soon as you can effect one for us.
Yours Verry Respectfully
John. B. Stuart
Of Somerville Alabama

John B. Stuart (First_Last)
Regiment Name 27 Alabama Infantry
Side Confederate
Company H
Soldier's Rank_In Captain
Soldier's Rank_Out Captain



Camp Chase Prison April 25th 1862

Dr Geo R Griffith
Co K 11th Miss Regt

Dear George – I have an opportunity by which it is probable a letter will get through. I am in constant correspondence with Claudine. Recd a letter from her 4 or 5 days since. Ma’s health is tolerable good. All others are well. Nellie & Benty were married 23rd Sept last. 70 members of my company were surrendered at Donelson including all the officers. George is in good health so are Jeff & Monroe Liddell. My health has been remarkably good. I have applied for permission to visit Ma’s family but Gov Tod has not notice my application as yet. I would be under lasting obligation to him if he would. I have another motive in view for visiting Yankees. If my wishes are gratified I will get a wife there when this terrible war ends. Give my respects to all.

Very truly your friend & c

F. W. Keyes

Write by fortress Monroe & no war news.

P.S. all letters containing contraband news are refused us.

***************
Hon O. R. Singleton
H. R. Richmond Va

Dear Sir, Mrs Clark a lady of this state having obtained permission to visit Richmond, kindly offers to become the bearer of letters from “Rebels” to their friends in “Dixie”. I have been here principally ever since the surrender of Fort Donaldson. I will thank you & my friends to do all that can de done to effect an exchange for me at the earliest moment possible. Gov Brown Maj Brinksdale & Gov McRae formerly knew me very well. I am a young member of the Carrolton Bat & 2nd Leiut Co “C” 20th Miss Reg. Capt ______
Please write me by return of Mrs Clark and inform me whether Maj Brown of my Reg was aided in being exchanged. Very Respectfully & c
Frank W Keyes

Crosswise across top of letter is written:
Please enclose this within letter to Dr G 11th Miss Rt. It was in Whitings Brigade when I last heard from it. Lt Col P F Liddell Comdg.

Envelope:
From Leiut Keyes
20th Miss Regt
Prisoner of War

Hon O. R. Singleton
House of Representatives
Richmond Virginia

Francis W. Keyes (First_Last)
Regiment Name 20 Mississippi Infantry
Side Confederate
Company C
Soldier's Rank_In 1 Sergeant
Soldier's Rank_Out 1 Lieutenant



Camp Chase Prison April the 22 1862

G W Jackson Dear Brother

Through the kindness of Mrs Clark I think I can get you a letter it is with great pleasure that I seat myself to drop you a line. This leaves me well in fact in better health than you saw me. I had 96 men taken with me & they are at Chicago but I hear from them often. They in fine health we have good quarters here & good rations. The federals is very kind to us & the Govner is doing all he can for our comfort he is a perfect gentleman in my opinion. My Brother I never have called upon you for any thing but I have got it now. I want you & Hardy to move my family to your house & take care of them until I come home. I can’t when I will get home. I may never get there & if I never get I want you to wid up my business in Allabamma & pay all my debts as I have plenty to pay my debts & then take care of my family. I have wrote to my wife but she may not get her letter & you may get this. Write to her & tell you heard from me. I would write more but they have to be read by the federals & they want them short which all wright. Tell my friends if it is please god’s will that we shall never meet no more on this earth may we meet where parting will be no more. I will tell you many things that I can’t write if I ever see you. Bless you & yours. Capt J. T. Jackson

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