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Camp Chase near Columbus Ohio April 21/62

Dear friend we was all taken prisoners of war at no 10 & reached here a week ago. Our boys & us was separated. They are at Springfield or Chicago. They was all well when I saw them last. We are well treated & cared for & have an opportunity by a ladys going to Richmond to write to our friends though I did not here it until a few minutes ago. I wrote to Blunt a few minutes ago. I want you to get the money from Trimble 240 dollars & buy stock young cattle. Trimble owes me 25 dollars for money loned him in January though I would like for you to lend me a few dollars if possible. No money but that of northern states are good. If Trimble has not collected my pay account tell him to do so & pay him for the same. Write soon. Give my resp to all friends. Write soon. J C Hubbard


Envelope addressed to: Mr W R Marshall
Dewitt AR



Camp Chais Ohio Ap 20 / 62

Mrs Deborah Taylor

I have onst more the opotunity of sending you a few lines whitch will inform yo that I am well & doing as well as a prisner cold expect. We have comfortable quarters & plenty to eat & air well treated. Confindment & being away from the dear one when I can neither see thy sweet fase nor hear frome the trubles me a grate deal but yo know my moto is to smile at truble & not to greave over that. That can not bee avoided iff it is the will of all mity god that I shold dy in prison his will be done & not mine. I expect to stay hear until I am exchanged & I hope that time will soon come. Brother James is at Indanaplis Indania. E R Enoch was sent to Sandusky Citty last week. He is well. S Sudford also went with Enoch yo can tell thair wives to be of good cheer for I don’t think they air widows yet & not to marry in thair absonce for fear they will come back & lay in thair claim. Give my lov to my dear Mother. Tell her not to greave her self about her absont boys for all will be well yet. Yo must kiss my sweet little sisters for me give my lov to Thomas & Willey tell them to bee good boys give my best regards to Father & Mother Smith & to all the rest of the family & also to Uncle James & family & all inquiring friends. I have a thousen things to tell yo but can’t rite it. Know yo must try to forget troble & injoy your self & look on the brit side of future. I remain your affectionate husben untill death. Chas F Taylor



Camp Chase Columbus Ohio April 12

Dear Pa I have wrote to you to let you know that I was taken a prisoner at island No 10. I being the only of my batt taken I am tolerably lonesome. I have formed some acquaintances with an Ala Reg. Homer is at Ti___ville with Mr Ezell. I am fairing verry well considering being minus means and cloes. I am not allowed to write but half a sheet. Direct your letters to camp chase Columbus Ohio. Military prison No 3. No telling when I will get out. Your affectionate son. J. S. Thomas



J. S. Reynolds Esq April 20th 1861.
My Dear Friend, I embrace this opportunity to write you a few lines and hope they may reach you, which is doubtful. I have written several letters to Catharine some of which I hope may have got through. I have no news to write you, from the fact that we get but little. My own helth and the helth of this prison is moderately good. My helth was verry bad for some time, and I came near going under from Rheumatism and the pleurisy. Our boys of our company are doing well. Peter Barker and myself get letters from them. We got one from Daniel Hudson yesterday. He reports them well. Only two deaths have occurred to wit) Green Harper and Jack Braden. We have been prisoners over tow months and I have not been out of the walls since I have been hear, though I manage to take as much exercise as our limited space will admit about 3 or 4 acres enclosed by a high plank wall in which thare is seventy cabins in the center of which thare is a cooking stove, and six bunks, in which we sleep from 12 to 15 men in a cabin. We get plenty of good wood, and provisions, which we cook ourselves. I am getting to be a good cook, but a poor hand at washing and patching. Those of us that have money can buy anything they want of this article I have little or none. Our money is worth 50 cents to the dollar. I have to do without many little necessities, which others enjoy. What little money I had, I purchased milk with, which when I can get, I mostly live on. I would rather have fifty dollars now, than three times the amount under other circumstances. But I am learning to do without. I never hear a word from home and it seems to me that away back in the past I had some friends, a wife and child and relations, but it all seems to have been in years gone by. Though not a day nor an hour pass over me but I think of home and my family and friends and much desire to see my native land. I hear there has been a great battle near Corinth and I have but little doubt that Brother James was in it. I feel great anxiety about him. I know the dangers of the battle field and if I were to hear that he had fallen, it seems to me that I should be completely undone. Oh God cover him in the big battle. I hope you will assist Catharine in any little matter in which she may need assistance. I know she is lonely and I hope you and Sister Mary and the little girls will visit her as often as possible. I can not say when I will be able to get away from hear. Some say we will soon be exchanged of the however I have no information though I hope such may be the fact. Are our friends trying to do anything for us or are they letting us drive along upon our own hook. Do if you please try and have something done fro me if it is in your power and while something is being done for me don’t forget one of our boys, for the last one of them are near to me. I know what they have suffered. I saw them stand firm as the hills on the battle field when death reigned supreme all around. Let Catharine see this letter. I wrote Mr Simpson to get me a letter though if possible. A letter mailed at Nashville and may be at Huntsville might reach me. If you can get me a letter give me all the news that is not contraband. Remember me kindly to my inquiring friends if thare be such.
Most Truly and affectionately W. M. Smith



Camp Chase Ohio April 20th 1862

My dear Hennie
I learn there will be an opportunity of sending a letter through to Richmond by a Mrs Clark. I write often hoping you will get some of my letters. Mrs Lettes informed you had got one. I hope you have received more ere that. Seems to me that you might get letters to me by watching for a chance and send them through the lines or by a flag of truce. I want a letter telling me of home and home things. If I live to get home I expect to find things some what changed. May that I left there might lose their lives upon the battle field as it seems that fighting has commenced in good earnest. The fighting no doubt will be hard and destructive. I want the war to close. So do you and most every lady else that are induring any of its hardships. I get letters frequently from my brotherinlaws and sisters in town. They will send me almost any thing I want. I do not need as much while in prison. I have not spent as much as ten dollars since I have been here. I have 55$ in U S funds and 45$ in Southern which I can sell at half price. Tell Bro Mc if he gets a chance to deposit one hundred dollars with Berry & Domoulle Nashville Tenn so I can draw if I need it. I can get it if it is put in these hands. The health of the prison is pretty good not much sickness. Some few cases of small pox. I have been vaccinated again and do not fear it much. I find a good deal of work to do cooking washing and various other things about house keeping. We can’t keep a nice house. Men are bad house keepers. I will be a right good cook before long so I may be of some use to you when I get home. Hennie I don’t want you to trouble yourself to much about me. I will try and take care of myself so as to live to get home and take care of you in future. You may expect some trials and difficulties but bear them all with patience. The was has brought trouble upon many a woman. We have preaching some Sunday. We have no talented preachers in prison rather on the common order. A nice preacher from Tenn preached a good sermon today by the name of Hendricks. I bought me a nice Bible yesterday which I intend to bring home with me. I lost the one I started from home with. I don’t dress fine here as I have no fine clothes. I am comfortably clod by very roughly. We have a sutler in our prison from whom we can buy almost anything we need in the line of clothing affordable. I must close now. I long to be with you. Could you see me take my lonely walks in prison with my head sown and thinking of you then you would think I was in much trouble but they are the most pleasant moments I have. I try to look upon the bright side of the picture and think what a joyful time it will be when I get home. Home sweet home when shall I get there. Kiss Little Penny for me. Give my love to Mother Father Bro Sister & friends and tell them I live in hopes if I die in despair we are kindly treated and have no right to complain.
I remain you affectionate and Devoted Husband
W C Criner

W.C. Criner (First_Last)
Regiment Name 27 Alabama Infantry.
Side Confederate
Company F
Soldier's Rank_In 2 Lieutenant
Soldier's Rank_Out 2 Lieutenant
Alternate Name
Notes
Film Number M374 roll 11




March 24 1862

To Mr F Trigg
Nashville

Having been prevented from seeing you before you left Nashville on your benevolent mission to Columbus, I took the liberty of writing to you yesterday by mail, but having found the mails to be very irregular, I write you again by the Rev. Mr Ward of this city, who visits Columbus to see a brother that is a prisoner there. You may recollect that I had the pleasure of being introduced to you by the Hon. Horace Maynard at his room, a few days since.
My youngest son, Alfred Henson Cross is among the prisoners at Camp Chase, Prison 2, Mess No. 12. as he informs me in a letter received yesterday. He arrived at Ft. Donelson only 4 or 5 days before the battle there and is just 18 years old. He had an attack of pneumonia last winter so severe as to endanger his life. I would very respectfully invoke your favorable consideration in his behalf and pledge myself that he will faithfully fullfil any promise he may make. I would therefore request that he be released on parole and be permitted to return home. If you cannot consistently with your duty allow him to come home I would suggest that I have a brother living at Mt. Gilead Ohio, and another at Basking Ridge N. Jersey, my own native place. Could he not then be released on parole till regularly exchanged, on condition of his remaining in the loyal states and with his uncles?
It has been the business of my life to teach and govern youth – first for a good many years in the Nashville University and since then in a private school and have ever found them susceptible to kind and generous treatment. I believe therefore that the youth of our country can in no way be more effectively won back again to a love of the Union, should it be restored than by an exhibition of kindness and generosity toward them.
I will only add that I have ever been opposed to this most unfortunate and unnatural war, and only yielded to his desire of joining the army when I saw or thought I saw, that every person of military years would have to do so. He went to Ft. Donelson to get a Lieutenancy in Artillery and hence was in the battle. I hoped he would thus be saved from the necessity of going in the ranks for which his education unfitted him.
Very Respectfully your obt. Serv.
Nathl. Cross



Camp Chase Ohio

J. L. Stroud
As I have opertunity of sending a letter through the lines, I will inform you of the unlucky fact that I am a prisoner of war!
As you have seen no doubt the surrender of Island Ten, I will make one comment. Five of our company attempted to escape but I fear not one reached home. Henre and myself was among the five that attempted to escape. We were taken five miles from where the Reg surrendered by cavalry. All the commissioned officers were brought here. The caps are at Chicago. Stanton and Harper were sick at the time of our going up. They were left behind to recover. They have not yet arrived. We are well treated. The confinement is limited to four acres. All of us lost everthing in the surrender. My earthly possessions consists of one suit of clothers – minus one sock a toothbrush and a cark screw. I am shamed to say my sword was surrendered without it being stained with blood but trust in the God of liberty, it was no fault of mine. I expect some of us will be pretty anxious to get home to Dixie before we die but never my boot tread Lynchburg soil until it can do it honorably. W. T. F.





Camp Chase
Columbus Ohio Apl 21/62

My Dear Phillis
As I have a good opportunity I write you to let you know where I am & how I am getting along.
We all arrived here last Sunday from Island No 10. We have all been well since the surrender. Maj Wm. H. Polk was here last week and got a parole for Martin Johnny & Sammy. They are back in town now (Columbus). I think that if they go to Gov Todd that he will parole me to town.
I hope that we will be exchanged before long. Mr Kirtland is here and is very well. I hope to see you before long. Robin is very well.
Love to all from your
Husband John Walker

To
Phillis Walker
From J. P. Walker, Memphis Tenn



Loachapoka Ala 1 May 1862

My Dear Bro
We have just heard of you whereabouts & I hasten to congratulate you upon your safety & c. I am now at your house writing on your desk with Sister Ellen your dear wife seated by my left sobbing in tears of joy for your welfair. She is in fine health & so are all the children. Father is in good health. Myself & family are as well as usual. Johns wife went to S.C. & in two weeks after being delivered of a fine daughter she died & was buried here last Saturday. The child is said to be doing well. Ellens mother has staid with her ever since you left. Can you let us hear of John & Thos Thomas if you can. Sister Ellen says please do so. We are glad to hear that you are treated well. We allow the Yankee prisoners the liberty of walking out doors & treat them very kindly otherwise. Sister Ellen would write but she is not collected in thoughts & I will do anything for her that I can.
Your Bro
W H Stanton

P S
We heard of you through a letter that Cap Rush wrote to his wife.



Cincinnati, April 17, 1862

Dear Brother,
I came down here this morning, expecting to see you, but heard at the hospital, that you had been mooved to Camp Chase, near Columbus Ohio. We heard you were sick & therefore wanted to see you very much. I have not time to go further to see you. I am stilling at Boston Ky & have to go back immediately. My wife & Molly came down with me, & wished to see you very much. If you need any money or anything else, write to me at Boston. We are all well & hope you will be well soon. We expect soon to go home. We are living at Boston. I built a new house at Strawhaw since you left.
Write soon – direct to boston ky
Your Brother
F. M. Smith



Camp Chase Ohio Apr 19th

Dear Mother, the hope of this reaching you is small yet as I an a prisoner with nothing else to do I will consider the chance worth undertaking. I learned a few hours since that a Ladie by the name of Mrs Clark was going across the lines and if any one wished to write she would carry their letters for them consequently I undertake a trial of it; I can not write you one word of interest more than I am in good health and have been the whole time since my imprisonment with the exception of the wound I received in the ankle; it has been very painful at times and is not entirely well yet still it is as I can walk a little I am in hopes it will soon be well. If so I can bear my confinement much more cheerful. I intend to be a man and live I hope to meet you again as I want to meet you in the once happy land of Dixie. Be of good cheer, meet your trials and troubles with a heart to stand them let them come as they may. It would be a great pleasure to me to meet you even here yet not amixed with pain. I have been treated well enough ever since I have been in the hands of the Federals. After I was wounded I remained in Somerset a week or more. Thence to Lebanon & remained there for a month, from there to Louisville. I remained a month there. These places are all in Kentucky. If I live a thousand years I,ll never forget the hospitality the ladies of Louisville & Lebanon shown me, they seemed to think they could not do enough for me. There is none of my company with me that you are acquainted with; John G Dack Greer are at Indianaplis Indiana. George Davis is also there. John Davis is in four miles of here, in the City of Columbus he wrote me a letter the other day saying he was in bad health & that the Drs say he has the consumption. Dion Rogers is dead, he died at Mound City Illinois on the morning of the 20th Feb. he died of Tiphoyed Pneumonia. God temper his afflictions to his distracted parents. G. W. Paris I learned is dead. He died at St Louis I believe of the same disease. I have told you all more that I am going to see you as soon as I can have an opportunity. Give my love to all my connections and friends. Tell Fran if I am a prisoner I have not forgotten her tell Brother Thomas Aaron to take good care of my horse for me. Forgive this childish and ill composed letter as ever your son,
Joseph H. Reese

P.S. William Baldwin is here with me. He is in rather delicate health he tells me he has been sick a great deal in the past two months; M. S. Wilson is in prison no 2. I have not seen him he sends me a note occasionally he is in good health; Samuel Humlet is with him in rather bad health. If you see Uncle Sterling and he cripples about any yet tell him I would like to hobble about with him; I guess we could have a lively time. Yours &c.
J H Reese



The State of Tenes
William Co June the 8 1862

Dear Brother i take mi pen in hand to drop you a few lines to let you now that me an mi family is weel at this time hoping when you reseave this to find you the same i want to heer from you very bad mothers family is also weel an mindys is weel. Dear Brother mothers is almos crasy about you an if you gitt this letter ansor it immediatly without fale.
Susan A Wallure


On the back of this letter in the same hand writing and bad grammar and spelling:

William is weel an also hairison Wee git leters from him evry week her latly so nothing more only wee all send our best an respects to you hoping wee will see you soone.

So good by
For this time

Thomas York



Camp Chase Prison 3 Mess 80
April 21st 1862

Gen. L. T. Wigfall
C. S. Senator
Richmond Va.

My Dear Sir
I am a prisoner of war incarcerated at Camp Chase. I am a 1st Lieutenant in the 50th Tenn Regiment and was surrendered at Fort Donelson. My health is very feeble and I am anxious to again breathe the free air of our sunny south.
Knowing your social & official intimacy with the C. S. Government & our former acquaintance while I was citizen of Jefferson Texas I am induced to ask your intercession in my behalf. The most effectual and most expediting manner of affecting an exchange outside of a regular system is by selecting an officer of my rank who is a prisoner in the south and requests the Confederate Government to release him on parole to come north and have me liberated or in case of failure to do so to return to his status in prison that he held before any negotiation was opened. I have selected Lt Riley of the 47th New York Reg. captured at _________ Inlet on the 17th of March but any other officer of my rank would do as well. I merely instance Lt Riley because I have heard of him. I feel assured through your influence some officer may be sent forth to exchange for me & I am confident that the authorities at Washington would readily consent to the exchange.
Hoping you will appreciate my position and exercise your influence with the war department for my early release I submit my case. Please let me hear from you by earliest opportunity.

I have the honor to be
Very Respectfully yours
John S Ward

Camp Chase Prison 3 Mess 30
Ap 21 1862

Hon Landon C Haynes
C. S. Senator
Richmond Va.

My Dear Sir
I am a prisoner of war in Camp Chase. I am a 1st Lieutenant in the 50th Tenn Reg surrendered at Fort Donelson. My health is very feeble and I am very anxious to be exchanged.
By the bearer of this I have written to Gen Wigfall C. S. Senator from Texas asking his influence in carrying out a plan for my exchange. I imagine the most expeditious way to effect an exchange is to select an officer of my rank who is a prisoner in the South and to release him on Parole to visit Washington and have me released or to return to his status in prison in case he fails to accomplish his mission. Knowing that the Confederate Government has a prisoner of my rank by the name of Lt. Riley of the 47th New York Reg I have selected him as a suitable man to have exchanged for me. He was captured on the 17th of March at Ulleito Inlet, S.C.
I feel the more confident in asking your influence from the fact that you are well acquainted with my brother in law Frank E Williams of Rusk Texas formerly of East Tenn and also from a fact (which perhaps you are not aware of) that I was the first man who even suggested through the public prints your name as a suitable man for Confederate Senator. Can I hope that you will cooperate with Gen Wigfall in procuring my release? This letter will be carried to Richmond by Mrs Clark.
Please let me hear from you.
Hoping through your influence to soon be beneath the skies of Dixie
I remain My Dear Sir
Very Respectfully yours
John S Ward


On the envelope:

Lt Jno S Ward
50th Tenn Reg. Camp Chase Ohio


Hon L. C. Haynes
C. S. Senator
Richmond
Va



These letters have not been previously published.

Except for the extracts by Tiffany, the images of the letters posted below range from very poor condition to fair condition. We are attempting to transcribe these letters the best we can, there will be errors and words we cannot make out for one reason or another. We apologize for these errors.

Transcribers are noted after each letter.

George Purvis



Camp Chase Ohio
April 21st 1862
Dear Brother

An other opportunity presents itself by which I
May possibly get a letter home. I have written many letter but
I fear none of them have reached their destination. If you should
receive this I want you to use some exertion in getting one to me.
I would give any imaginable dream for one letter or one encouraging
word. I have not heard anything since I left the last time which was
near the 1st of March. If there is any chance for exchange ________ to
hear and exchange unmarried ____ I will depend on your efforts in my
behalf. Tell father & mother not to grieve it is the fate of war. We are
well treated as prisoners. I would write _____ if I had the privilige to
do so. I would to god I could see all of you but that is impossible. I
am almost crazy to hear from home. We have a variety of diseases in
this place ( line through words) first is small pox. Goodbye.

Your Affectionate brother,
R. W. Clark


Notes:
Transcribed by Pam Watts
The middle initial may be a N, M or W.
There is possibly an envelope with this letter
but the copy is to dark to read.



Columbus Ohio June 4

Dear father i thought i would writ you a few lines to you to let you now how i am getting a long i am well at the present an hop to find you the same i have bin ???? for mother to write to you but she his a nursing Mrs Hoods for the last few weeks and she is is about sik hersef and i want her to come home but she won’t i will tel you the new that ant Ellan was her last she heant now she is gone to June i am a ( scratched out) now i wish that you was out i see that ther is a person in for Joseph Priest he was sent at the same time that you

Mrs. Miles send her love to you and nose that you will ask about this man that a yo man that named Joseph asked about you and want to know when you come home Mr Tucker _______ an he say that old ________ Sterling Liaset now to you to due what you learn in you letter if i can do any more for you I want you to write to me and I will do all I can for you to get liberty and i will tel you the news that ______ _______ and cut my hand and _______ _______ _______ ______ so I can’t milk an _____ for I am all alone with the baby I have him in my lap so you must think how i can mend but am doing my best so that you mit hear form mother this is that i have to tele you now you Doroty Mary Jane Gishing iam mard to Garg Ghingson my husband has gone to ______ ______ _______ so i am ________ here now _______ ______ you Mary Jane Ghingson I am gone but _______ left to met you


Notes:
Transcribed by Pam Watts and Elaine Purvis
Very hard to read, poor copy from original.



Envelope addressed to ---
Mr. James H. Carter
Mechems River
Albemarle County Virginia

Via Norfolk Virginia
(Unable to read)

On left of envelope “Prisoner of war Camp Chase Ohio


Camp Chase Columbus Ohio April 20 1862

Dear brother I seat myself this morning to rite you a few lines hoping they find you and family all well these few lines leave me well doing the same I have not much to rite to you Bute Bute I have I have ritin to you on every Sunday since I have been here in prison and as it is Easter and I am lonesome I will try an rite to you as you all don’t rite to me as I wonder does me as good to have a letter from you to reade every nite I have looked so long an not got eney It does me as good from my heart to thanks that I ________ have the pleasure to rite to you all from time where I was last Easter an last Christmas one year a go an now look where I am I am in Prison in Camp Chase Bute I am not suffering eney pains from it Bute there is a great meney have I can’t know how long before it may fall to my lot as there are some cases of small pox in prison Their were 5 men taken out of the prison an yesterday some more died with it an there are some vary good dr here an they are the best that the care for all of the dr say I do not have much time to go out for I am at worke every day making B____ P______ and sleeve Buttons an rings an I can sell them as fast as I can make them at 2.50 for B____ P_____ and for sleeve buttons 1.50 an rings 50 but I don’t have much time to make meny for my self I have to put date in for other ones I have to got to be a silver smith I can make 8 to 9 dollars per weake I rite a letter to my wife to day I must close By loving God be with you CB Carter.


Notes:
Name is Charles B. Carter according to Knauss
Transcribed by Elaine Purvis
Unknown unit



The extracts were copied by D. B. Tiffany. No scans of the letters exists only these extracts.

In an article about a reunion of "Morgan's Men" at Lexington, Kentucky, July 24-25-26, 1883, is the following:
Then followed another pleasing episode in the presentation of a beautiful gold-headed cane to Captain Tiffany, a Federal officer, who was Postmaster at Camp Chase prison when many of Morgan's men were prisoners there, and who had always shown them every kindness in his power. Colonel Breckinridge made the presentation speech, Captain West responded for Captain Tiffany in eloquent terms, and the old gentleman himself melted down in attempting to say a few words. He found that these hard fighters knew how to appreciate kindness shown them in the hour of their need.—Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XI, p. 432.


Dec. 62
“George this is a good place to stay. The officers here is the nicest men. We have plenty to eat and to ware here.
(Va) John H. Pains”

Dec. 62
“I expect to be exchanged in two or three weeks, This is the best prison I has saw, we live as well here as in any of our hotels in Dixie.
(Va) J. W. Haywood

Dec. 62
My O, what a dinner Turkey, Chicken, Roast Beef, Oysters,, Green pea-ches, Pound Cake, Honey Apple dumplings, pies, and a thousand little things to mention, my health is fine and I am getting very fleshy, and too big for my cloathes.
(Va) (could be Sm) E. Russell

Dec. 62
“Bill of fare at the Virginia House, Bean Soup, Hog and Corn, pork and hominy Roast beef, Turnkey, Duck, Shanghai Chicken, Oysters, apple dumplings, pound cake, sweet cakes, green peaches, peach pie et. et. et.
(Va) Ecl (h?)

Dec. 62
We have plenty to eat here and to ware, and the officers that commands this place is nice men.
V. J. H. Hewson

Dec. 62
I want nothing I have every thing that heart could wish except my liberty freedom. I am doing well and being fine and fat
(Va.) Jonathan Musgrave

Dec. 62
We have nothing to do but eat and sleep, and have plenty to eat, enough to drink and very good bed to sleep on we have no occasion to - ovr – complain, we have very nice officers here, as nice as any need of.
Va John A Carson

Dec 62
To Wife – I received a letter from you dated the 18th of this month in which you express and great deal of uneasiness about my suffering here. I have a good husk mattress and a parcel of cotton comforts and a couple of pillows so that I can sleep quite com-fortable. I have no need of cloathing, the good being has blessed me in the midst of my afflictions.
(Va) D. D. Davidson

January 63
I have been treated very well indeed, all the boys that come with us are very well, and we have all come to the conclusion that Camp Chase is not such a hard place as reports make it.
(Va) Wm J. Clark


Notes:
Transcribed by Valerie Protopapas(11/2008). From the look of the paper itself, this must have been written in an account book of some sort which leads me to believe that these – all in the same hand – are copies of letters from soldiers that were sent that were being kept by the authorities in Camp Chase. As noted in my comment on the site, I’m not familiar with Chase but it sounds rather too much of a good thing at least from these early letters. If later letters show a less than idyllic condition, one wonders if they were sent though the lines.




Camp Chase Columbus Ohio April 21st 1862
Dear Mother I have an opportunity of sending this by a lady going to Richmond and write to let you know that though I am a prisoner I am in excellent health and in high hopes of again meeting you my family and my friends once more,though when God only knows. We are kindly treated and have plenty of the necessar
ites of life and the only suffering is on account of my family. Tom was well when we were separated on the 10th. From what I can learn all the prisoners are well treated by the Federals and I believe Tom will not suffer as much in prison as he did in Camps. I hope you will not be troubled about us as I firmly believe we will be safely returned to you, I also wrote to Henrietta* today, tell her that all letters are read first by the Superintendent of the prison and to write only about our own affairs and of our neighbors. Enclose letters in an envelope addressed city of Richmond. Hettie*will tell you how to direct - please visit her as often as possible and all of you must bear this affliction with Christian patience and fortitude. I bear the confinement much better than I am imagining possible and think that restraint for a while will be beneficial to me. I will know how to appreciate home enjoyments when I return. Give my love to ---- & Lucy & ------ and to my friends. We are not confined to our rooms but have the range of the whole of the prison about 70 houses arranged in streets* and 12 men in a house. We have cooking stoves and are as confortable as we could expect though I would give all I am worth to see my family once more. Jack sends his respects to you & ------- .You must not be afraid of not seeing us soon
as I feel confident that something will be done in reference to the prisioners soon. We all bear our ---- of --- ----- ---- --- than you imagine and hope for better times --- for your son. ---- ----- ----- ---- --- & yours we may ----- ----- ----- but hope and pray. Your son W.S. Smith

* (Transcribers words)
Transcribed by Elaine and George Purvis






Camp Chase Ohio
April 21st 1862

Dear Brother,

Another opportunity presents itself by which I may possibly get a letter home. I have written many but I fear none of them have reached their destination. If you should receive this, I want you to use some exertion in getting one to me. I would give any imaginable sum for one letter or one encouraging word. I have not heard anything since I --- the last time which was near the 1st of March. If there is any chance for exchange ------------ it will depend on your efforts on my behalf. Tell father & mother not to grieve, it is the fate of war. We are very well treated as prisoners. I would write more if I had the privilege to do so. I --- to God I could see all of you but that is impossible. I am almost crazy to hear from home. We have a variety of diseases in this place. ---- ----- ---- ---- is small pox. Goodbye
Your affectionate brother
R. M. Clark




Camp Chase Columbus Ohio April 21st 1862
Dear Mother I have an opportunity of sending this by a lady going to Richmond and write to let you know that though I am a prisoner I am in excellent health and in high hopes of again meeting you my family and my friends once more, though when God only knows. We are kindly treated and have plenty of the necessar
ites of life and the only suffering is on account of my family. Tom was well when we were separated on the 10th. From what I can learn all the prisoners are well treated by the Federals and I believe Tom will not suffer as much in prison as he did in Camps. I hope you will not be troubled about us as I firmly believe we will be safely returned to you, I also wrote to Henrietta* today, tell her that all letters are read first by the Superintendent of the prison and to write only about our own affairs and of our neighbors. Enclose letters in an envelope addressed city of Richmond. Hettie*will tell you how to direct - please visit her as often as possible and all of you must bear this affliction with Christian patience and fortitude. I bear the confinement much better than I am imagining possible and think that restraint for a while will be beneficial to me. I will know how to appreciate home enjoyments when I return. Give my love to ---- & Lucy & ------ and to my friends. We are not confined to our rooms but have the range of the whole of the prison about 70 houses arranged in streets* and 12 men in a house. We have cooking stoves and are as confortable as we could expect though I would give all I am worth to see my family once more. Jack sends his respects to you & ------- .You must not be afraid of not seeing us soon
as I feel confident that something will be done in reference to the prisioners soon. We all bear our ---- of --- ----- ---- --- than you imagine and hope for better times --- for your son. ---- ----- ----- ---- --- & yours we may ----- ----- ----- but hope and pray.

Your son W.S. Smith

* (Transcribers words)
Transcribed by Elaine and George Purvis





[b]For more reading about Camp Chase, check out these links.

George


http://www.censusdiggins.com/prison_campchase.html

http://www.lib.lsu.edu/cwc/projects/dbases/chase.htm

http://www.geocities.com/pentagon/quarters/5109/

http://www.forgottenoh.com/Cemeteries/campchase.html




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